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5 Tax Benefits you Get for Being the Owner of a Historic House

Historic house attracts many people for the character they hold. These houses can be expensive to buy, but you will get lots of tax benefits for owning one. Different tax incentives are present in local, state and federal levels to encourage people to buy such properties.

Tax freeze

Every year, your historic house will gain market value. As the appraised value of your house increases, your taxes will increase. You can work with your local historical preservation office or any historical society and try to freeze on property tax increases. Freezes last for 10 to 15 years depending on your plan to renovate it or keeping the historical character of the property unaltered.

10% rehabilitation credit

If your property was built before 1936 then you can get additional tax credits. If your house was renovated before 1936 then you can apply for a 10% back on the cost of renovations. So, for example, if you spent $100,000 to renovate a house for a business that was built in 1935 then you will get $10,000 in tax credits.

Easements

An easement is an agreement between a property owner and a historical preservation society representative. You get excellent benefits for maintaining the property’s historic character. You can get it in the form of a reduction in property tax or income tax. You can get this benefit forever. It is filed as a deed with the property title and is passed down to the future owners.

State tax credit

There are many states in the U.S who have adopted tax credits for historic building renovations then you can get tax incentives. You can find many historic buildings in traditional economic centers like downtowns. Renovating a house there can help in renovating the neighborhood, so the state actually supports that and gives you incentives. While federal tax incentives are limited to businesses, state tax incentives are not. So, you can get state tax incentive by renovating your own house.

Grants

There are some private philanthropic organizations who are dedicated to preserving historic properties. They can give you grants for renovations or preservation. Preservation is a philanthropic activity for many businesses. For example, the American Express Partners offer grants for renovation of historic buildings.

These incentives can equal a very large amount; so, it’s worth buying a historic house. You get the attention, the satisfaction and tax savings by buying historic houses. Before you buy a historic house you must check out with your local historical society to find out what kind of benefits you can get, so that you don’t miss out.…

4 Things that Go On People’s Mind When they Enter a Historic Home

There is something mystique about historic homes. It seems that mystery is hidden everywhere. This attracts many people towards old homes. Here are some of the things people think when they enter a historic home.

1. The ruins and rots

People look at the ruins and rots of the old house. It gives them a different feeling.They start picturing in their minds how the house might look if renovated.

2. They wonder what lies beneath

 

 

This type of house reminds them of horror movies. They try to imagine what might lie beneath. Is there a skeleton or a bag of gold coins? They keep on wondering. They look at the wood, the paint and try to imagine what it was like years back.

3. They know that there is a special history associated with the house

They will ask if there is a special story of the house. If there is, they will love the house more as they will have something to share with others and boast about it.

4. They will get excited seeing original hardwood.

 

Just like how a motorcycle collector will react when they see an Indian with an original engine, people who love historical things will love the original hardwood and materials of the old times.

Visiting a historic house is a very thrilling experience. People who love this kind of houses know how it feels and they enjoy living in these houses a lot.…

5 Things to Know Before Buying a Historic Home

One interesting feature of buying a home is that every generation leaves its mark on it by having decorations of their time or making unique changes. The amount of work and money needed to maintain a historic home can vary. It mainly depends on its current condition. If want to buy a historic home, here are six things you should remember.

Trade-offs of historic districts

If you are looking for a house in a designated historic district, then you might have some restrictions on designing the exterior of the house. You may not choose your own preferred paint color or window type. You should check this information with your local planning department. The design restrictions in those places apply to everyone. These places have a more steady property value.

Historic preservation easement

If you set up a historic preservation easement then it will protect the historic integrity of your house. You need to hire a professional to hold the easement. This is a legal tool that places restriction on what changes can be made to the property. Once this is made, the future owners must adhere to these rules.

It is costly to maintain the home’s integrity


Historic homes are structurally sound; that’s why they last for such a long time. However, it depends on when the home was built. For example, a house built in the 1600s is structurally stronger than one that is built in the 1980s. So, your house might need extensive repair depending on the condition of the house.

It is difficult to get financing and insurance

You can get finance in many ways. However, lenders may hesitate if extensive repairs are required. You can get private housing loans for doing small repair works. The insurance companies may not want to sell a home insurance policy to you. This is because the replacement costs are higher for certain historic homes.

You might have old problems

You might have old problems like the presence of lead paint. Modern homes don’t have lead in paint, but houses made before 1978 have it. Asbestos may also be present.

Historic homes are a great investment. But you may not be able to fit your modern styles in it. This shouldn’t be much of an issue as the main reason people buy historic homes is for their vintage look and feel. You should keep these points in mind while purchasing a historic home.…

3 Things to Avoid When Renovating Historic Homes

There are lots of charms in historic homes. However, they are old and you can have hidden troubles for that. With good planning, you can renovate a historic home without any hassle. Here are some of the things you should avoid when renovating historic homes.

Don’t make the decision before you inspect the home

This image is a work of a Federal Emergency Management Agency employee, taken or made as part of that person’s official duties. As works of the U.S. federal government, all FEMA images are in the public domain in the United States.

Before you decide, you should do a standard inspection of the house. You should hire a professional who specializes in historic homes to do a good home inspection. They should look out for lousy wiring, inefficient windows, bad foundations, plumbing areas, etc. You should get the estimates from a few contractors for the repair works. This will let you know the extra time and cost you need to bring the home to shape.

Don’t create a strict budget

With historic homes, you should be always prepared for unexpected things. So, you must keep room for extra costs involved. You should keep 10% extra money on your budget for the unexpected problems that may arise.

Don’t ruin the place’s character

Historic home is appealing for its uniqueness and history. You should preserve those characteristics when you renovate these homes. There are some design elements in these homes that are hard to replicate, like ornate fireplaces. You should try to design around those details.

Living in a historic home is something amazing. You should always focus on keeping it’s unique appeal and value while renovating it.…

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