5 Things to Know Before Buying a Historic Home

One interesting feature of buying a home is that every generation leaves its mark on it by having decorations of their time or making unique changes. The amount of work and money needed to maintain a historic home can vary. It mainly depends on its current condition. If want to buy a historic home, here are six things you should remember.

Trade-offs of historic districts

If you are looking for a house in a designated historic district, then you might have some restrictions on designing the exterior of the house. You may not choose your own preferred paint color or window type. You should check this information with your local planning department. The design restrictions in those places apply to everyone. These places have a more steady property value.

Historic preservation easement

If you set up a historic preservation easement then it will protect the historic integrity of your house. You need to hire a professional to hold the easement. This is a legal tool that places restriction on what changes can be made to the property. Once this is made, the future owners must adhere to these rules.

It is costly to maintain the home’s integrity


Historic homes are structurally sound; that’s why they last for such a long time. However, it depends on when the home was built. For example, a house built in the 1600s is structurally stronger than one that is built in the 1980s. So, your house might need extensive repair depending on the condition of the house.

It is difficult to get financing and insurance

You can get finance in many ways. However, lenders may hesitate if extensive repairs are required. You can get private housing loans for doing small repair works. The insurance companies may not want to sell a home insurance policy to you. This is because the replacement costs are higher for certain historic homes.

You might have old problems

You might have old problems like the presence of lead paint. Modern homes don’t have lead in paint, but houses made before 1978 have it. Asbestos may also be present.

Historic homes are a great investment. But you may not be able to fit your modern styles in it. This shouldn’t be much of an issue as the main reason people buy historic homes is for their vintage look and feel. You should keep these points in mind while purchasing a historic home.…

3 Things to Avoid When Renovating Historic Homes

There are lots of charms in historic homes. However, they are old and you can have hidden troubles for that. With good planning, you can renovate a historic home without any hassle. Here are some of the things you should avoid when renovating historic homes.

Don’t make the decision before you inspect the home

This image is a work of a Federal Emergency Management Agency employee, taken or made as part of that person’s official duties. As works of the U.S. federal government, all FEMA images are in the public domain in the United States.

Before you decide, you should do a standard inspection of the house. You should hire a professional who specializes in historic homes to do a good home inspection. They should look out for lousy wiring, inefficient windows, bad foundations, plumbing areas, etc. You should get the estimates from a few contractors for the repair works. This will let you know the extra time and cost you need to bring the home to shape.

Don’t create a strict budget

With historic homes, you should be always prepared for unexpected things. So, you must keep room for extra costs involved. You should keep 10% extra money on your budget for the unexpected problems that may arise.

Don’t ruin the place’s character

Historic home is appealing for its uniqueness and history. You should preserve those characteristics when you renovate these homes. There are some design elements in these homes that are hard to replicate, like ornate fireplaces. You should try to design around those details.

Living in a historic home is something amazing. You should always focus on keeping it’s unique appeal and value while renovating it.…

Follow Us On