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Insulating Your Home Properly

When it comes time to prepare for the Winter season, it’s absolutely vital that you take the necessary steps to insulate your historic home properly and safely. Ensuring your home has sufficient, updated insulation is important because when the air outside begins to get colder and drier, you can have massive energy loss and non-efficient HVAC systems that can drastically increase your overall heating and cooling bills. Having a home contractor come to your house and checking over or replacing any needed insulation, in both your crawl space or attic space, can have huge benefits in the long run.

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Deciding to invest in a properly-certified home contractor for your insulation replacement is critical! If you decide on replacing your insulation as a do it yourself project, it’s important to take the time to review and research not only the instructions on how to properly replace insulation, but the safety and security procedures you should follow as well, especially if you decide to use a material such as fiberglass or another material that can be inhaled into your lungs through the small particles.

Fiberglass in particular is very hazardous because the material tends to break down into very small particles, which in turn are very sharp and corrosive. Wearing the proper equipment when working in your attic or crawl space is just as important as the replacement process itself.

Some of the necessary items to prepare for replacing your insulation include:

  • A fiberglass-rated mask: this is important because if you use just a typical “surgeon mask”, the micro-particles of the fiberglass can come through the thin paper filter, leading to you inhaling the particles, which is bad for your lungs.
  • Baby powder: a surprisingly common tool of the trade, some contractors rub baby powder over their skin before they deal with fiberglass insulation, because it helps to prevent the particles from entering your pores and skin, causing irritation and potentially hazardous conditions.
  • Insulation replacement tools: you should have some basic tools ready to go for the insulation replacement process, such as hammers, saws, nails, levels, wood slats, and of course, the proper insulation material that you prefer for the job.

Once you have all of the necessary items, and have taken the required steps and preparations for replacing your insulation, you can begin.

Some of our most important tips for replacing fiberglass insulation include:

  • Checking the R-value of the insulation: this is the number on insulation that represents how much insulation-strength the material has. In general, the higher the R-value, the better the insulation.
  • Verifying fire safety conditions: if you happen to have any specialized lighting such as recessed lighting, it’s important that you keep the insulation at least 4 inches away from the light fixture, to ensure there are no issues in the future. Insulation material is very flammable, and is prone to catching on fire quickly.
  • Check for venting before replacing insulation: it’s vital that you leave all vents open and free in your attic/crawl space when you replace insulation.

If you decide to go through with a DIY insulation replacement process, following the tips we laid out, as well as doing your proper research beforehand, can be the difference between a seamless, easy project, and a potential nightmare in the future.…

5 Tax Benefits you Get for Being the Owner of a Historic House

Historic house attracts many people for the character they hold. These houses can be expensive to buy, but you will get lots of tax benefits for owning one. Different tax incentives are present in local, state and federal levels to encourage people to buy such properties.

Tax freeze

Every year, your historic house will gain market value. As the appraised value of your house increases, your taxes will increase. You can work with your local historical preservation office or any historical society and try to freeze on property tax increases. Freezes last for 10 to 15 years depending on your plan to renovate it or keeping the historical character of the property unaltered.

10% rehabilitation credit

If your property was built before 1936 then you can get additional tax credits. If your house was renovated before 1936 then you can apply for a 10% back on the cost of renovations. So, for example, if you spent $100,000 to renovate a house for a business that was built in 1935 then you will get $10,000 in tax credits.

Easements

An easement is an agreement between a property owner and a historical preservation society representative. You get excellent benefits for maintaining the property’s historic character. You can get it in the form of a reduction in property tax or income tax. You can get this benefit forever. It is filed as a deed with the property title and is passed down to the future owners.

State tax credit

There are many states in the U.S who have adopted tax credits for historic building renovations then you can get tax incentives. You can find many historic buildings in traditional economic centers like downtowns. Renovating a house there can help in renovating the neighborhood, so the state actually supports that and gives you incentives. While federal tax incentives are limited to businesses, state tax incentives are not. So, you can get state tax incentive by renovating your own house.

Grants

There are some private philanthropic organizations who are dedicated to preserving historic properties. They can give you grants for renovations or preservation. Preservation is a philanthropic activity for many businesses. For example, the American Express Partners offer grants for renovation of historic buildings.

These incentives can equal a very large amount; so, it’s worth buying a historic house. You get the attention, the satisfaction and tax savings by buying historic houses. Before you buy a historic house you must check out with your local historical society to find out what kind of benefits you can get, so that you don’t miss out.…

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